Energy and Environment

Competition Impacts of Energy Tariff Options: There and Back Again

The broad question looming over these recommendations is this: will this new intervention – which is essentially a negation of the previous one – bring about positive outcomes for the consumers? by Paul Monroe Ensuring sufficient competition in the energy market is a key role of the regulator. One of the most popular measures for

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Policy in the Face of Uncertainty: The Smart Meter Dilemma

by Victoria Plutshack Smart technologies, which can communicate and share information, have been hailed as a panacea for a range of our energy problems. The possibilities for energy savings and greater energy efficiency are enormous. The first step in realizing the smart vision of the future is the humble smart meter, which is due to be

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Paving the Way for Driverless Cars: A Policy Roadmap

by Ed Leon Klinger Driverless cars present an unprecedented opportunity to transform the way we transport goods and people through cities and across countries, posing benefits to our collective safety, environment and economy. They also pose new risks; as cars become more connected, they become more vulnerable to malicious attacks by thieves and terrorists. This essay

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Water as a Strategic Tool in Central Asia

by Hannah Smith Limited water resources, weak states and ethnic tensions across Central Asia lead many analysts to believe that the region will bear witness to the world’s first war over water. Through drawing on fieldwork, this study takes the example of the geographically isolated village of Barak (a Kyrgyz exclave) to demonstrate how water resources

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The Role of Research in Developing Energy Policy

by Andrew Robertson Decarbonising the electricity sector has been identified as a short-term priority for cutting UK greenhouse gas emissions in response to the risks of climate change. The scale and rate of change in the electricity sector means that there is a strong need for energy research and a big potential for new research to

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Beyond Human Right vs. Commodity: Time to Realistically Assess Water Scarcity

by Simon Damkjaer The water resources community remains stuck in a futile debate of whether water constitutes a human right or a commodity, which is resolved through the content of General Comment 15: water constitutes a human right, which puts conditions on economic approaches to water and its commodification. Instead, it is time to address the

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Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Energy Storage: Toward a Sustainable and Equitable Future

by Christina Chang and Rebecca Farnum Our world is running out of fossil fuels to burn for energy. Therefore, even if we were not concerned with climate change, we need to be able to produce and store energy sustainably from renewable sources. Sunlight is an abundant energy supply, and the blueprint for sustainable energy creation and

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Implementing UK Wind Energy: Lessons from Environmental Psychology

by Victoria Plutshack As the UK aims to produce 15% of its energy consumption from renewables by 2020, planning policy becomes increasingly important to facilitate the large-scale implementation of renewable technologies. As it stands, there is great opposition to wind farms across Wales, the North East of England and Scotland. How can we improve the

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Energy Subsidies and the Flawed Dominance of Economics in the UK Energy Sector

by Raphael J. Heffron New economic thinking is needed in the UK energy sector. The mainstream economic approach to the electricity sector needs to be radically altered, and two new approaches are discussed in this article. The first focuses on restructuring the electricity market, and the second on achieving parity for low carbon energy sources

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Business models for electric vehicles

by Claire Weiller Claire’s research focuses on how new business models can help overcome the obstacles typically presented by electric vehicles, including high battery costs, current range limitation, and the lack of infrastructure. The piece highlights the fact that much remains unknown about what business models will look like in future. Will customers even own

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