2014-2015

Water as a Strategic Tool in Central Asia

by Hannah Smith Limited water resources, weak states and ethnic tensions across Central Asia lead many analysts to believe that the region will bear witness to the world’s first war over water. Through drawing on fieldwork, this study takes the example of the geographically isolated village of Barak (a Kyrgyz exclave) to demonstrate how water resources

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The Role of Research in Developing Energy Policy

by Andrew Robertson Decarbonising the electricity sector has been identified as a short-term priority for cutting UK greenhouse gas emissions in response to the risks of climate change. The scale and rate of change in the electricity sector means that there is a strong need for energy research and a big potential for new research to

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Weighing the Benefits and the Risks: Better Defining Regulation of New Technologies

by Michele Mastroeni Regulation of science and technology is an important factor in how our technological landscape develops, and whether a technology makes it to the end-users. While ideally regulation will be based on broadly accepted values and trusted scientific assessment, the reality is much more complicated. Just as different technologies spur intense debate in society,

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Pathways for Academic Impact: Biased Towards Commercialisation?

by Tim Guilliams Given the current economic climate it is important to maximise academic impact on society. Measures of academic impact have been dominated by the commercialisation of academic discoveries, thereby failing to capture the complete spectrum of academic activities that lead to societal impact. In fact, universities do not appear to act as a significant

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Beyond Human Right vs. Commodity: Time to Realistically Assess Water Scarcity

by Simon Damkjaer The water resources community remains stuck in a futile debate of whether water constitutes a human right or a commodity, which is resolved through the content of General Comment 15: water constitutes a human right, which puts conditions on economic approaches to water and its commodification. Instead, it is time to address the

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Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Energy Storage: Toward a Sustainable and Equitable Future

by Christina Chang and Rebecca Farnum Our world is running out of fossil fuels to burn for energy. Therefore, even if we were not concerned with climate change, we need to be able to produce and store energy sustainably from renewable sources. Sunlight is an abundant energy supply, and the blueprint for sustainable energy creation and

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