2016-2017

Book Review: Utopia for Realists By Rutger Bregman

Put on your utopic glasses, and get inspired… by Karen Stroobants Are we still able to think big, to imagine a better world than the one we currently live in? Rutger Bregman, a young Dutch historian, certainly thinks so. I have been following his activities for a while now, as he strongly believes in the concept of ‘a basic income for everyone’, and

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Income Inequality and the Internet of Things: interesting links between ‘socially just’ and ‘environmentally sustainable’

“In these cases, what seems to be crucial is the connection between efforts to reduce inequality and to adopt technologies in sectors such as water and waste management, which are absolutely crucial for Climate Change policies. In terms of policy, it appears that ‘socially just’ is very close to ‘environmentally sustainable.’” By Nicolás Valenzuela-Levi Public interest on income inequality increased during the last decade. Among scholars,

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Special Issue 2017: Science, Technology & Inequality

  The Special Issue 2017 is dedicated to the tensions between science, technology, policy and inequality. Inside we have articles by four wonderful authors covering gender, income inequality, solar panels, universal basic income, network technologies and much more. Look no further for a glimpse into the ongoing negotiation between society and science.   The Special

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Insect Pollinators and Policy

‘Bees and other wild pollinators are fascinating, beautiful, and vital to our food production. They have pollinated our crops for millennia; now it’s time for us to return the favour.’ – Dave Goulson, DEFRA by Erin Cullen Pollination is the process of pollen being transferred to the female reproductive organs of a plant and fertilisation taking

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On the Road to 2025: The Global Dementia Decline

Most diseases have sudden well-defined symptoms, but isn’t forgetfulness just a part of ageing? How do you know when you should be concerned?  by Philip Lindstedt With the increasing life expectancy of the global population age-associated diseases stand to become the greatest plague of the 21st century. Indeed, in the U.K. dementia has recently overtaken heart

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Empowering through Light: Women and Solar Home Systems in Rural Bihar, India

When researchers asked questions about life before and after access to solar home systems, they were struck by the fact that none of the answers centered on the women’s own needs in their life. by Shivi Chandna In rural India, women in poor households spend a large part of their day performing basic tasks such as

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A Look at the Attrition of Women in STEM

The loss of skilled women from the STEM workforce in academia has not gone unnoticed…[but] even with policies in place, a change in broader culture will be necessary to precipitate the desired changes. by Sumana Sharma The underrepresentation of women in leadership positions in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) is usually attributed to the ‘leaky

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Competition Impacts of Energy Tariff Options: There and Back Again

The broad question looming over these recommendations is this: will this new intervention – which is essentially a negation of the previous one – bring about positive outcomes for the consumers? by Paul Monroe Ensuring sufficient competition in the energy market is a key role of the regulator. One of the most popular measures for

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